Fermented sweet brown rice porridge bread

Results: impossibly sticky and pudding-like on the inside and crust with a satisfying crunch layered in a smoke ring of robust dusty molasses. Prime marbling of melted brown rice hiding between each crumb. It possesses the most delicate whiff of tangy hoppy wheat.

IMG_2437
FERMENTED SWEET BROWN RICE PORRIDGE BREAD
adapted from Tartine Book No.3

Fermented sweet brown rice
Sweet brown rice – 3 cups
Sourdough starter – 1 tablespoon
Water to cover

In a large jar, combine the above ingredients and cover with cheesecloth or sprouting screen. Let sit 24 hours at room temperature.Drain and rinse sweet brown rice. In a large saucepan, add rice and cover with 6 cups water. Cook as you would any rice, taking care to check the grains from time to time – you want them completely cooked through and somewhat gelatinous. Cool slightly before adding to bread.

Leaven
Active whole wheat sourdough starter – 25 g
Fresh-milled whole wheat flour – 200 g
Water – 200 g

Mix, cover, and let rest 4-8 hours depending on ambient temperature (more time during colder months). The leaven is ready when a dollop floats in water.

Dough
Leaven (above) – 150 g
Fresh milled whole wheat flour – 1,000 g
Wheat germ – 70 g
Water – 800 g

Mix with one hand until no dry bits remain. Cover and allow to hydrate (or autolyse) 30 minutes.

Redmond Real salt – 25 g
Water – 50 g

Add these and squish with hands until fully agglomerated. Let rest 30 minutes.

Fold & turn (1) the dough by wetting one hand, grabbing the underside, stretching and folding the dough back onto itself. Rotate the bowl and do this 2-3 times more. Rest 30 minutes.

Bulk rise
Fermented sweet rice porridge (from above) – 700 g

Mix the porridge into the dough by using your hands to lovingly fold and turn the dough over itself from the bottom (2). Rest 60 minutes. Fold & turn (3). Rest 30 minutes. Fold & turn (4). Rest 30 minutes. Fold & turn (5). Rest 30 minutes. (This should take approximately 3.5 hours and includes the time involved with mixing in the porridge.)

Gently coax the (very) wet dough onto a heavily floured counter-top. Dust the top with flour and divide in half. Using a dough spatula, work some flour into each round until it holds its shape a little better. Dust the tops again with flour, cover with a tea towel, and rest 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, line 2 medium-sized bowls with clean tea towels and generously dust with brown rice flour. Take the dough spatula and use it to purposefully flip the dough over so that the smooth side is down. It should be round but fairly rectangular. Pull each side slightly and fold towards the center like a package, working first with the bottom, then sides, & finally top. Working as if the dough spatula were replacing one hand, pull and roll the dough until the bottom seam is sealed. Plop smooth-side down into the floured, towel-lined bowls. Dust with flour, cover with the long flap of the towel, and place into the refrigerator for 24 hours.

Bake

Preheat a cast iron dutch oven (with lid on) @ 500 degrees in the bottom third of the oven. Delicately, dip the bowl of one dough round into the piping hot dutch oven. It should fall in almost like you meant for it to. Score in any fashion you’d like, cover, and place into the oven. Cook 20 minutes. When the timer beeps, reduce the oven temperature to 450 degrees, and set the timer again for 10 minutes. Now, brave the scorching oven and remove the lid. Bake again 20-25 minutes until deeply brown.

Here is a nice cheat sheet for the bake:

     Lid ON – 500 degrees, 20 minutes
                     450 degrees, 10 minutes
Lid OFF – 450 degrees, 20-25 minutes

Lastly, let cool on a wire rack before slicing into. You will be graced with a bread with the texture of tender cake. Heat the oven back to 500 degrees and bake the second loaf just as the first.

Yield 2 loaves.

IMG_2431

FERMENTED SWEET BROWN RICE PORRIDGE BREAD.

adapted from Chad Robertson’s Brown Rice Porridge Bread.
to Susan @ Wild Yeast Blog.
(k)

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2 thoughts on “Fermented sweet brown rice porridge bread

  1. susanbach

    Jeez that looks amazing… (but do I really have to make it, or can I taste some of yours?) When are you going into business????

    Reply

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